Frost

“Frost” (escarcha) you may know, especially if you have been in Northern Europe in autumn, winter and spring. A weather forecast during those seasons will say “there will be 4 degrees of frost” (cuatro grados bajo cero). If it is very cold your toes could suffer from “frostbite” (congelación).

“Frost” is also a verb. In England in winter, gardens sometimes “frost over” (cubrirse de escarcha).

The adjective is “frosty” and ”frosted” and the adverb is “frostily” (glacialmente). Examine these:

  • It is a frosty morning
  • Mr. Sanchez gave Mr. Podemos a frosty (glacial) smile.
  • Mr. Barnier was very frosty with Mrs. May.
  • He frostily (frialdad) spoke to her.

Are you the chef at home? If so, you might have made a cake or two. Sometimes cakes are frosted (escarchada). So you might put “frosting” on your Christmas cake.

So, on a frosty morning, you might admire the frost covering your lawn, and then go on to make a cake with a frosted topping, or a “frosting” (glaseado) of sugar.