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Second-guesses

To guess (adivinar) you may know. To “second-guess” something or someone, in British English, means to anticipate (anticiparse), forecast or predict what is going to happen, or what a mortal might do.

In American English the meaning is different: it means to criticize someone or something when the results of an action (cuestionar a posteriori) are known.


Two examples of the British English usage:

  • I cannot second-guess what the Spanish stock market (la bolsa) will do next month (no puedo pronosticar lo que va a ocurrir en la bolsa…). I am a mere mortal (…simple mortal).
  • Trying to second-guess what Mr. Trump is going to say is practically impossible.

Two examples in American English:

  • It is not for me to second-guess (cuestionar) the decisions of the EU top dogs.
  • PSOE, the Spanish Socialist party, will not second-guess the political judgement (efectuará criticas) of Mr. Sanchez, the Spanish Prime Minister.